Everything you Need to Know About Utility Rooms

Read our blog post for our advice on utility rooms - everything you need to know.

Our guide to utility rooms

Few homes now have a dedicated room for laundry, clothes-drying and to store the mop and vacuum cleaner. Instead, now that space carries such a premium in price, the washing machine is in the kitchen and we dry clothes in the dryer - or on radiators throughout the house...

Wanting larger kitchens has been the kiss of death to the laundry/utility room, but they still very much have their place. If you've got a utility room, you will consider yourself very lucky. If you haven't, don't dismiss the possibility of clawing back some space to create one. It might feel like a waste but it actually frees up your living space and makes it more efficient to live in; consequently, it's a huge selling point in a family house. Ideally, a utility area houses the washing machine, dryer, ironing board, a sink and drying pulley. It also has storage space for cleaning utensils, mops, vacuums, vases and other household necessaries, well away from the food preparation areas.

It doesn't need to have great head height or be beautifully finished - an unconverted basement is a good location as long as it's not too damp and you provide good ventilation. You won't regret it. This is the engine room that keeps the rest of a house running smoothly and tidily, and if you have the space it's well worth creating one.

Laundry Chutes!

If you can make it work, fit a laundry chute in the bathroom. It is fantastic feature and a great timesaver for people with busy lives. There's an old-world glamour to chucking your laundry into the bathroom chute, even if you have to sort it yourself at the other end! You need free space between the floors without plumbing, wires or other obstructions. You can hide the chute ends in cupboards, with a big laundry basket at the bottom. Perhaps this is a little impractical for the majority of homes though.

You need free space between the floors without plumbing, wires or other obstructions. You can hide the chute ends in cupboards, with a big laundry basket at the bottom. Perhaps this is a little impractical for the majority of homes though.